Automated Dev Database Branch-Switching with AzureSQL, PowerShell and GitHooks

“Keep it simple, stupid!”
– My year 12 & 13 English Lit. Teacher

Recently I’ve been fascinated with something really cool. A couple of my colleagues at Redgate wrote a GitHook which allows you to easily switch branches using Redgate SQL Clone. You can see the hook here with full instructions – and I thought it was pretty neat.

But it got me thinking – I’ve posted a lot about when people are using just Azure SQL DBs (PaaS), about Masking and DB Change Automation, but when you’re using AzureSQL for Dev and Test DBs as well as Prod, you still don’t have the same agility one would expect from a local copy, like a clone.

But, the above GitHook leverages PowerShell (among some other fancy wizardry) so, what if we could do this exact same thing, using the PowerShell Az module to dynamically create and switch Azure SQL DBs in our own private resource groups every time we checkout a branch?

my hero academia wtf GIF by Funimation

I don’t imagine it would be fast because I’m restricted to using very low tier SQL DBs by my tiny allowance of (as Kendra Little calls them) “Azure Bucks”, but it should absolutely be possible!

So I decided to write a PowerShell script to do just that.

The first question I had to come up with an answer to was, how do I replace the Clone “Image” in this process, because I need something that is effectively a copy of our Production (or as near as possible) environment so we have something to base EVERY copy from – so I created the idea of a Golden Copy within the script; effectively this golden copy could be created by copying masking and copying back down from Production using something like Redgate Data Masker and my scripts here in GitHub but as a stop-gap, if it doesn’t find one in the Resource Group and Server you select, it will simply create one from your Dev DB. Best answer I could think of, you’re welcome to improve it!

All that remained was effectively to go through and just mimic the functionality of the Clone script but using Az: so if you are switching to a new branch where you don’t already have an existing Dev DB, then you get a new copy of Golden. If you’re switching to a branch you’ve checked out before, it renames the DBs to swap you back to the correct branch.

Here is an empty AzureSQL DB called DMDatabase_Dev:

When I now issue the git checkout “feature/newfeature” command it asks me to sign in to my Azure account:

and then gets to work:

And… that was it really.

I now have an Azure SQL DB called DMDatabase_Dev_master as I switched from the master branch, and I have a branch new DMDatabase_Dev DB that I can use for my featurebranch. You’ll notice I didn’t include -b in my git command, let’s assume a colleague is already working on this branch. I can now just update my copy (of my golden copy) with their work:

And we’re good to go!

But now if I switch back to my main branch, the object is gone and I can carry on with work on this branch:

It was really straightforward I can’t believe I haven’t seen this in use in more places, but hey guess what? The PowerShell is yours right here if you want it:

https://github.com/ChrisUnwin/PowerShell/blob/master/Demos/Redgate%20Demos/GitHookAzureSQL.ps1

The pre-requisites for it are:

  • You should have a Dev DB and you should update the values at the top of the script with the Dev DB name, server and resource group it is in
  • The script make reference to and creates a Golden copy DB so that you have something you should always be creating from, for consistency – so when you get started, create your own “Golden copy” back from Test/UAT or something if you can – maybe using the script mentioned above – it should be the name of your Dev DB appended with “_Golden”
  • If you want to change how it is authenticated so you don’t have to enter your credentials each time, then go for it – this was just the simplest method for me (and it’s currently 11:05pm so I’m going to bed!)

Feel free to improve it, I’m sure there are plenty improvements that can be made, but it’s a starter for 10 for anyone out there just getting started with development in Azure SQL. Plus it’s kinda neat!

Flyway and tSQLt – migrating to warmer test climates

“If you truly have faith in your convictions, then your convictions should be able to stand criticism and testing.”
DaShanne Stokes

Welcome fellow TestDriven-Development enthusiasts… is what I would say if i actually ever did TDD and didn’t just, you know… write regular unit tests after the fact instead.

I’m going to be honest, I love the idea of TDD but have I ever actually been able to do it? No. Have competent developers been able to do it successfully? Yes, of course. Don’t know anything about TDD? You’re in luck! Click here for an introduction (don’t worry though, THIS post is not going to be about TDD anyway, so you can also keep reading).

But one thing we can all agree on is that testing is pretty important. Testing has evolved over the years though and there are a million-and-one ways to test your code, but one of the most difficult and frustrating things to test, from experience, is database code.

gilmore girls shot of cynicism GIF

Some people argue that the days of testing, indeed, the days of stored procedures themselves are gone and that everything we do in databases should be tested using a combination of different logic and scripting languages like Python or PowerShell… but we’re not quite there yet, are we?

Fortunately though we’re not alone in this endeavor, we have access to one of the best ways to test T-SQL code: tsqlt. You can read more about tsql at the site here but in short – we have WAYS to test your SQL Server* code. The only problem is, when you’re using a migrations approach… how?

*There are also many ways to unit test code from other RDBMS’ of course, like utPLSQL for Oracle Database or pgTAP for PostgreSQL – would this method work for those? Maybe! Try adapting the method below and let me know how you get on!

I’ve already talked about how implementing tests is easier for state based database source control in a previous post because we can easily filter tests out when deploying to later stage environments, however with migrations this can be a real pain because you have to effectively work on tests like you would any normal database changes, and maybe even check them in at the same time – so ultimately, they should be managed in the same way as database schema migrations… but we can’t filter them out of migrations or easily pick and choose what migrations get run against test and Prod, without a whole lot of manual intervention.

Basically. It’s a mess.

mess fail GIF

But during my last post about Flyway I was inspired. This simple and easy to use technology just seems to make things really easy and seemingly has an option for EVERYTHING, so the question I started asking myself was: “How hard would it be to adapt this pipeline to add unit tests?” and actually although there were complications, it was still easier than I thought it would be! Here’s how you can get up and running with the tSQLt framework and Flyway migrations.

1 – Download the scripts to create the tSQLt framework and tests from the site

Ok this was the easiest step of them all, largely because in the zip file you download from the tsqlt website all you have is a set of scripts, first needed to enable CLR and the second to install the tsqlt framework:

As part of my previous pipeline I’m actually using Azure SQL Database as my development environment, where RECONFIGURE is not a supported keyword and where we don’t need to run the CLR script anyway, so all I needed was the tSQLt.class.sql file.

The good thing about this is that we can copy it across into a migration and have this as our base test class migration, and then any tests we write on top of it will just extend it – so as long as we remember to update it _fairly_ frequently with any new tsqlt update, we should be fine! (Flyway won’t throw an error because these are non persistent build objects, so no awkward checksum violations to worry about!)

2 – Adapt the folder structure in the repository for tests

I added 2 new folders to my _Migrations top level folder, a Schema_Migrations folder and a Test_Migrations folder. When you pass Flyway a location for migrations, it will recursively scan folders in that location looking for migrations to run in order. I copied the migrations I had previously into the Schema Migrations folder and then my new tSQLt creating migration into the Test Migrations folder. This allows them to be easily coupled by developers, whether you’re writing unit tests or practicing TDD:

You’ll have noticed I called my base testing migration V900__ – this is because I do still want complete separation and if we have a V5 migration in schema migrations and a V5 testing migration, we’re going to have some problems.

3 – Add a callback to handle removal of the objects

As I was putting this together, I noticed that I could use flyway migrate to run the tSQLt framework against my Dev database, but every time I tried to then flyway clean that database I got a very nasty error stating that the tSQLt assembly could not be removed because of dependent objects.

Flyway does not handle complex dependencies very well unfortunately, that’s where you’d use an industry leading comparison tool like SQL Compare so, with some advise from teh wonderful Flyway team, I set to work on a callback. A callback is how you can hook into Flyway’s own processes, telling it to do something before, during or after certain commands. In my case we were going to remove all of the tSQLt objects prior to running Flyway clean to remove the rest of the schema. To make it future proof (in case objects are added or removed from the tSQLt framework), I wrote a couple of cursors to go through the different objects that were dependent on the assembly and remove them, rather than generating a script I know to have all of the tSQLt objects in right now. You can find the code for the callback in my GitHub here, you are welcome to it!

Animated GIF

All you have to do is name it beforeClean.sql and ensure it is in the directory with your other sql migrations so that it will pick this up and run it – I put it in my Test_Migrations folder, because I only want it to run this callback when cleaning the build DB, as this is the only place we’re utilizing automated unit tests… for now!

4 – Update the Azure DevOps pipeline

I’ve got my callback, I’ve got my tSQLt migration and the folder structure is all correct and is pushed to Azure DevOps but naturally it is breaking the build *sad* but fortunately all we now have to do is update the YAML pipeline file:

trigger:
- master

pool:
  vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

steps:
- task: DockerInstaller@0
  inputs:
    dockerVersion: '17.09.0-ce'
  displayName: 'Install Docker'

- task: Bash@3
  inputs:
    targettype: 'inline'
    script: docker run -v $(FLYWAY_LOCATIONS)/Test_Migrations:/flyway/sql -v $(FLYWAY_CONFIG_FILES):/flyway/conf flyway/flyway clean -enterprise
  displayName: 'Clean build schema'

- task: Bash@3
  inputs:
    targettype: 'inline'
    script: docker run -v $(FLYWAY_LOCATIONS)/Schema_Migrations:/flyway/sql -v $(FLYWAY_CONFIG_FILES):/flyway/conf flyway/flyway migrate -enterprise
  displayName: 'Run flyway for schema'

- task: Bash@3
  inputs:
    targettype: 'inline'
    script: docker run -v $(FLYWAY_LOCATIONS)/Test_migrations:/flyway/sql -v $(FLYWAY_CONFIG_FILES):/flyway/conf flyway/flyway migrate -enterprise
  displayName: 'Run flyway for tSQLt'

You will notice a couple of important things that I have highlighted above:

  1. I’m cleaning the build schema using the Test_Migrations repository – this is because that is where my callback is and I need that to run before the clean otherwise it will fail due to the tSQLt assembly issue (line 17)
  2. I am running the migrate for the tests and the schema separately in the file, instead of just calling flyway to recursively run everything in the _Migrations folder. This is because I want them to be 2 separate steps, in case I need to modify or remove either one of them, or insert other steps in between and so that I can see the testing output in a separate stage of the CI pipeline (lines 23 and 29).

Caveat: As a result of (Option 2) running the 2 processes separately, it means running Flyway twice but specifying the Schema_Build and Test_Build folders in the YAML as being mapped to Flyway’s sql directory (lines 16 and 22 in the file above) but the problem this causes is that the second time Flyway runs, when it recursively scans the Test_Migrations folder it will not find the migrations that are present in the Flyway_Schema_History table, resulting in an error as Flyway is unable to find and resolve the migrations locally.

The way to fix this though is pretty simple – you find the line in the Flyway Config file that says “IgnoreMissingMigrations” which will allow it to easily continue. We wouldn’t have to worry about this setting though, if we were just recursively looking to migrate the Schema and Test migrations in the same step (but I’m a control freak tee-hee).

Now, once committed this all runs really successfully. Velvety smooth one might even say… but we’re not actually testing anything yet.

5 – Add some tests!

I’ve added a single tSQLt test to my repository (also available at the same GitHub link), it was originally created by George Mastros and is part of the SQLCop analysis tests – checking if I have any user procedures named “SP_”, as we know that is bad practice – and I have wrapped it up in a new tSQLt test class ready to run.

You’ll notice I also have a V999.9__ migration in the folder too, the purpose of this was to ‘top and tail’ the migrations; first have a script to set up tSQLt that could be easily maintained in isolation and then end with a script that lets me do just 1 thing: execute all of the tests. You can do this by simply executing:

EXEC tSQLt.RunAll

and we should be able to capture this output in the relevant stage of the pipeline.

Some of you may be asking why I chose to have the run unit tests as part of the setting up of the testing objects – this was because I had 2 options:

  1. I’m already executing scripts against the DB with Flyway, I may as well just carry on!
  2. The only other way I could think to do it was via a PowerShell script or run SQL job in Azure DevOps but the 2 plugins I tried fell over because I was using a Ubuntu machine for the build.

So naturally being the simple person I am, I opted for 1! But you could easily go for the second if you prefer!

6 – Test, Test, Test

Once you’ve handled the setup, got the callback in place (and also followed the steps from the last blog post to get this set up in the first place!) you should be able to commit it all these changes and have a build that runs, installs tSQLt and then runs your tests:

I realize there are a lot of “Warnings” in there, but that is just Azure DevOps capturing the output, the real part of this we’re interested in is lines 31-40 and if we clean up the warnings a little you’ll get:

+----------------------+
|Test Execution Summary|
+----------------------+
|No|Test Case Name|Dur(ms)|Result |
+--+---------------------------------------+-------+-------+ 
|1 |[somenewclass].[testProceduresNamedSP_]|144|Success|
------------------------------------------------------------
Test Case Summary: 
1 test case(s) executed, 1 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 errored. 
------------------------------------------------------------------

But if I introduce a migration to Flyway with a new Repeatable Migration that creates a stored procedure named SP_SomeNewProc…

+----------------------+
|Test Execution Summary|
+----------------------+
|No|Test Case Name|Dur(ms)|Result |
+--+---------------------------------------+-------+-------+ 
|1 |[somenewclass].[testProceduresNamedSP_]|184|Failure|
------------------------------------------------------------
Test Case Summary: 
1 test case(s) executed, 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 errored. 
------------------------------------------------------------------

It even tells us the name of the offending sproc:

All I have to do now is make the corresponding change to remove SP_ in dev against a bug fix branch, push it, create a PR, approve and merge it in and then boom, the build is right as rain again:

Thus bringing us back into line with standard acceptable practice, preventing us from delivering poor coding standards later in the pipeline and ensuring that we test our code before deploying.

Conclusion

Just because you adopt a more agile, migrations based method of database development and deployment, doesn’t mean that you have to give up on automated testing during Continuous Integration, and you can easily apply these same principles to any pipeline. With just a couple of tweaks you can easily have a fully automated Flyway pipeline (even xRDBMS) and incorporate Unit Tests too!

Shall we begin? (With data classification)

“If I had an hour to solve a problem I’d spend 55 minutes thinking about the problem and 5 minutes thinking about solutions.”
Albert Einstein

So I just spent about 20 minutes trying to come up with a suitable title for this blog post, and then it struck me – one of my favorite movies of all time (which I will soon be ensuring my wife and I watch again) is Star Trek into Darkness, featuring the magnificent Benedict Cumberbatch, in which he masterfully growls the phrase “shall we begin?”.

shall we begin benedict cumberbatch GIF

This sums up perfectly where people find themselves at the beginning of their classification activities. “Where do I start?” is usually the first question I get asked – regardless if you’re using an excel sheet, Azure Data Catalog or Redgate SQL Data Catalog to carry out this process, you will find yourself in the same place, asking the same question.

Classifying your SQL Server Tables and Columns is not straight forward, I’ll say that up front – you have to be prepared for whatever may come your way – but give yourself a fighting chance! Whether you’re looking to better understand your data, protect it, or you’re just hoping to prepare your business to be more able to deal with things such as Subject Access Requests (SARs), the Right to be Forgotten *cough* I’m looking at _you_ GDPR *cough* – or even just key development in systems containing sensitive information; this is the ultimate starting point. As per my blog post on data masking here, you can’t protect what you don’t know you have.

This is my effort to give you the best possible start with your classification process, whether this feeds into a wider data lineage process, data retention or, of course, data masking. So… shall we begin?

Get a taxonomy set up

This is perhaps the most crucial part of your success. Even if you have the best classification process in the world it really means nothing if you’ve basically described your data in one of say, 3 possible ways. The thing to bear in mind before getting started is that the data cataloging process is not specific to one job.

You may think at this point in time that you’re going to use it to highlight what you want to mask for Dev/Test environments, or maybe it’s your hit list for implementing TDE or column level encryption – but this _thing_ you’re building is going to be useful for everyone.

  • DBAs will be able to use this to help them prioritize systems they look after and being more proactive when it comes to security checks or updates, backups etc.
  • Developers will be able to use this to better understand the tables and environments they are working on, helping them contextualize their work and therefore engage and work with any other teams or individuals who may be affected or who may need to be involved.
  • Governance teams and auditors will be able to use this to better understand what information is held by the business, who is responsible for keeping it up to date and how it is classified and protected.

The list goes on.

So all of the above will need to be engaged in a first run to help actually describe the data you’re working with. What do you actually care about? What do you want to know about data at a first glance? Below is the standard taxonomy that comes out of the box with Redgate’s Data Catalog:

Some of my favorites are in here, which I would encourage you to include as well! If nothing else, having Classification Scope as a category is an absolute must – but I’ll come to this soon. You can see though, how being able to include tags such as who owns the data (and is therefore in charge of keeping it up to date), what regulation(s) it falls under and even what our treatment policy is in line with any of those regulations is, gives us so much more to go on. We can be sure we are appropriately building out our defensible position.

Having a robust Taxonomy will enable you to not only know more about your data but to easily communicate and collaborate with others on the data you hold and the structure of your tables.

Decide who is in charge

This seems like an odd one, but actually one of the most common questions I get is about who will be carrying out the classification process, and this is where the true nature of collaboration within a company is going to be absolutely critical.

Some people believe that a DBA or a couple of developers will suffice but as you’ll see later on, this is not a simple process that only 1 or 2 people can handle by themselves. Be prepared to spend hours on this and actually the implementation of classification means by nature you are going to need a team effort in the first instance.

You will need representation from people who know the database structure, people who know the function of the various tables and people who know the business and how data should be protected. You will require representation on this team and the collaboration between Dev, DBAs, Testers, Governance and DevOps, and you will need someone central to coordinate this effort. When you have key representation from these teams, it will make it easier to identify and collaborate on hot spots of data, so ensure you have this knowledge up front.

Get rid of what doesn’t matter

You may be surprised that the next step is technically an execution step, but it is an important point nonetheless and will absolutely help with the classification effort. This is where the Classification Scope category comes in, and this is why it’s my favorite.

One of the biggest problems that people face when actually executing on their classification is the sheer enormity of the task. There is no “average” measure we can rely on unfortunately but even small schemas can be not insubstantial – recently, some work I did with a customer meant they provided me with just ONE of their database schemas which had well in advance of 1800 columns across dozens of tables. When you scale that same amount to potentially hundreds of databases, it will become rapidly clear that going over every single column is going to be unmanageable.

To start then, the knowledge brought by the team mentioned above will be invaluable because we’re going to need to “de-scope” everything that is not relevant to this process. It is very rare to find a company with more than 50% of columns per database which contain PII/PHI and even if you are one of those companies, this process can help you too.

There could be many reasons that something shouldn’t be included in this process. Perhaps it is an empty table that exists as part of a 3rd party database schema, such as in an ERP or CRM solution. It could be a purely system specific table that holds static/reference data or gathers application specific information. Regardless what the table is, use the knowledge the team has to quickly identify these and then assign them all with the necessary “Out of Scope” tag.

This will not only help you reduce the number of columns you’re going to need to process significantly, but will give you greater focus on what does need to be processed. One of the greatest quotes I’ve heard about this process comes from @DataMacas (a full on genius, wonderful person and someone who over the years I have aspired to learn as much from as possible) who referred to it as “moving from a battleships style approach to one more akin to minesweeper“. Which is just so incredibly accurate.

In my example database below with only 150 odd columns, using the “Empty Tables” filter, and then filtering down to system tables I know about, I was able to de-scope just under half of the database, just as a starting point:

Figure out patterns and speed up

Many of the people carrying out this process will already have some anecdotal knowledge of the database as I’ve already mentioned, but now it’s time to turn this from what _isn’t_ important, to what is.

The fastest way to do this is to build up some examples of column naming conventions you already have in place across multiple databases – there will likely be columns with names that contain things like Name, Email or SSN in some format. Both SQL Data Catalog from Redgate and Microsoft’s Azure Data Catalog have suggestions out of the box that will look at your column names and make suggestions as to what might be sensitive for you to check and accept the classification tags.

Now these suggestions are incredibly helpful but they do both have a reduced scope because they’re just matching against common types of PII, so it’s important to customize them to better reflect your own environments. You can do this fairly easily, one or both of the following ways:

1 – Customize the suggestions

In Redgate’s SQL Data Catalog you can actually, prior to even looking at the suggestions and accepting them, customize the regular expressions that are being run over the column naming convention to actually check that they are more indicative of your own schemas – either by editing existing rules or by creating your own rules and choosing which tags should be associated with the columns as a result:

You can then go through and accept these suggestions if you so wish, obviously making sure to give them a sense check first:

2 – POWER ALL THE SHELL

In both of the aforementioned solutions you can call the PowerShell API to actually carry out mass classification against columns with known formats – this will allow you to rapidly hit any known targets to further reduce the amount of time spent looking directly at columns, an example of the SQL Data Catalog PowerShell in action is the below, which will classify any columns it finds where the name is like Email but not like ID (as Primary and Foreign keys may, in most cases, fall under the de-scoping work we did above) with a tag for sensitivity and information type (full worked example here):

Finally – get classifying

This is the last stage, or the “hunt” stage. It’s time for us to get going with classifying what’s left i.e. anything that wasn’t de-scoped and wasn’t caught by your default suggestions or PowerShell rules.

You can obviously start going through each column one by one, but it makes the most sense to start by filtering down by tables which have the highest concentration of columns (i.e. the widest tables) or the columns that are specifically known as containing sensitive information (anecdotally or by # of tags) and classifying those as in or out of scope and what information they hold, who owns it and what the treatment intent is at the very least.

The approach i take in this instance is to use filtering to it’s utmost – in SQL Data Catalog we can filter by table and column names but also by Data Type. Common offenders can be found with certain NVARCHAR, XML or VARBINARY types, such as NVARCHAR(MAX) – to me, that sounds like an XML, JSON, document or free-text field which will likely contain some kind of difficult to identify but ultimately sensitive information.

Following the NVARCHAR classification I move on and look at DATETIME and INT/DECIMAL fields for any key candidates like dates when someone attended an event or even a Date of Birth field. This helps especially when the naming conventions don’t necessarily reflect the information that is stored in the column.

Finally, one thing to add is that you will need access to the databases or tables at some point. You can’t truly carry out a full-on data classification process purely against the schema, especially for the reason above. Data will often exist in places you weren’t aware of, and knowing the contents, format and sensitivity of the data can only reasonably be found and tagged if you have the support of the data team to do so.

Conclusion?

This is not a one time thing. The initial classification is going to be the hardest part but that can be mitigated if you follow some of the processes in this post and ultimately work as a team.

Classification though, is ongoing. It is there to be an evergreen solution, something that provides context for any data governance or DevOps processes that you have in place and therefore should be maintained and treated as what it is. The place that everyone is able to use to gather information about what they will be using, and what the company might have at risk.