PASS Data Community Summit 2021

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.”
Socrates

I will be speaking at PASS Data Community Summit 2021

I have spoken at previous PASS Summits; both through the virtue of working for Redgate, and off my own back through dedication and passion to the subject matter I speak about: Data Privacy and Protection.

In 2018 I stood on stage with Microsoft to speak about the nature of Static Data Masking, how it differs from Dynamic Masking and what challenges need to be considered for a successful static masking rollout.

In 2019 I stood on stage alone to talk about creating a strategy for masking non-Production environments, including a walkthrough of the dbatools.io masking functionality utilized alongside Azure SQL Database classifications. PASS Summit 2019 was also when Kendra Little encouraged me to set up this blog, for which I’m forever grateful.

In 2020… well. You know what happened.

In 2021 Summit sees a new lease of life. Data Community Summit will be entirely online (no surprises there) but one big surprise you might not know is that it is completely free to attend. Never before will there have been SUCH a swathe of incredible speakers, with such a huge variety of topics and learning pathways for free and available on demand afterwards.

The dates for your diary? November 8-12, 2021

As it happens, I will also be speaking about setting up an end to end deployment pipeline using the Flyway Community Edition, Azure SQL Database and Azure DevOps it would be great to see you but with so much on offer I could absolutely understand if you watched on catch up!

You can see all the speakers here, but here’s a short list of some oft he sessions I will definitely be tuning in to!

  • Erin Stellato – Demystifying Statistics in SQL Server
  • Grant Fritchey – Identify Poorly Performing Queries – Three Tools You Already Own
  • Tracy Boggiano – Azure SQL Fundamentals
  • Angela Tidwell – Azure Devops Dashboards EZ as pie-charts!
  • Indira Bandari – Getting started with Python for Data professionals
  • Jess Pomfret – Azure SQL & Our Toolbox To Manage It
  • Taiob Ali – Think like the Cardinality Estimator
  • Neil Hambly – Azure Notebooks – Data Science fundamentals
  • and many more!

So please go check it out & register, support the community and do a bunch of learning in the process – it will be amazing to see you there and hopefully I’ll even get to see some of you in person in the not-so-far future!

Configuring Dynamic Data Masking in Azure SQL Database from SQL Data Catalog using PowerShell

Horror is the removal of masks.”
Robert Bloch

I spend a great deal of my time talking about Data Masking, don’t believe me? Checkout here, here, here and even here. I talk about it a LOT, but I’m always talking about Static Data Masking (SDM), which is the process of masking the data at the file level itself so it is irreversibly altered – this is fabulous for non-Production environments like Dev and Test, especially when you pair it with a good cloning technology.

But what about Staging / Production environments?

I often work with teams to implement SDM and one of the fastest routes to successfully generating your masking sets for cloned environments is, of course, SQL Data Catalog (or cataloging solution of your choice) – you’ve already put the effort in to classify your columns and figure out where sensitive information exists within your databases and instances… so doesn’t it make sense that we can just use THAT as a source of truth and generate masking from there?

Note: I actually produced an end-to-end video showing the process of Cataloging, Masking and Cloning in under an hour here: https://www.red-gate.com/hub/university/courses/sql-data-catalog/end-to-end-data-protection-with-sql-data-catalog-and-sql-provision – if you watch/try it let me know how you get on!

Funnily enough though we wouldn’t want to use SDM for Production (and potentially Staging) environments though – as it irreversibly changes the data, it’s just going to completely mess up all of our Prod data. To tackle this then, many people I work with turn to Dynamic Data Masking.

Dynamic Data Masking (DDM)

DDM is a method of masking the data based on your access rights to the data. As far as customers see they have access to their data through our site or application no issues, but if anyone else needs to query that data, or different people need to see different results when querying environments, DDM has been their way to go.

Whilst a lot of people like to pick up on some of the well known downsides of DDM, it’s not like you’re entrusting the entire security of an environment to it alone – there are a ton of measures we can put in place and DDM is just one; like an ex-colleague of mine (someone very wise whom I admired greatly and am still sad to this day I no longer get to work with them) used to say: “It’s about building a defensible position. The more you do the easier it is to prove you’re doing something and the more likely you are to BE protected.

So when a customer asked this week if it was possible to configure Dynamic Data Masking from SQL Data Catalog (because they’d seen the “Treatment Intent” category and the tag that clearly states “Dynamic Data Masking”), just like we’re able to configure Static Data Masking, well now that was a challenge I couldn’t turn down!

The SQL Data Catalog Taxonomy Page – Treatment Intent Category showing Dynamic Data Masking

DDM in Azure SQL DB

Configuring Dynamic Masking in Azure SQL DB is fairly straight forward through the Azure portal, you can go to your Azure SQL DB, click Dynamic Data Masking and it gives you the option to simply pick and save columns to apply Data Masking to, and to whom these rules apply / don’t apply:

DDM in the Azure Portal for the DMDatabase_Dev, with masks configured on customer_firstname and customer_email

However when we potentially have a lot of columns or DBs to configure masks for this is really going to get very old very fast. As with all things, I turned to PowerShell for the answer and fortunately I found it: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-sql/database/dynamic-data-masking-overview?#set-up-dynamic-data-masking-for-your-database-using-powershell-cmdlets – basically I can get existing DDM configurations and set new configurations for columns directly from my Azure SQL DB using PowerShell.

Now I’m not expert on DDM, and Redgate Data Masker for SQL Server is not a DDM solution (so I’ve only ever needed to know SDM really) I don’t pretend to be, but it seemed that I had everything I needed to tie Catalog into DDM.

PowerShell time!

I’ve written so much PowerShell to get classifications out of Data Catalog at this point it’s become second nature, but if you’re using the SDC PowerShell module and you need a reference you can view it here: https://documentation.red-gate.com/sql-data-catalog/automation-with-powershell but the standard “stuff” goes:

  • Pull down the PoSh module
  • Connect to catalog where it’s installed using an Auth token
  • Grab out the classifications with Get-ClassificationColumn
  • Shrink this down to just the columns we care about based on the tags

But the Az PowerShell cmdlets were honestly just as easy to use! I was surprised how easy it was to get up and running:

  • Connect to my Azure subscription
  • Get the current list of columns already with DDM masks
  • Remove these from the Catalog list
  • Update the remaining columns to use the default Mask

This was the full code I ended up using:

# This script is intended to be used with Azure SQL Database and Redgate SQL Data Catalog, however you are welcome to adapt and edit as required
# It will pull columns out of azure that are already being masked, and a list of columns that need to be masked with DDM
# It will then rationalise these, and configure Default DDM masks for any columns not already being masked on that Azure SQL DB

#Variables for Azure SQL DB & Catalog
$ResourceGroup = "DMDb"
$ServerName = "dmnonproduction" # Your instance minus .database.windows.net
$instance = "dmnonproduction.database.windows.net" # The instance or logical SQL Server as displayed in SQL Data Catalog
$DatabaseName = "DMDatabase_Dev"
$CatalogServer="http://pse-lt-chrisu:15156" # Your SQL Data Catalog location, leave off the trailing "/"
$authToken="REDACTED" # Your SQL Data Catalog Auth Token
$AzureSub = "Redacted" # Your Sub ID

# Get the SQL Data Catalog PowerShell Module & Connect
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri "$CatalogServer/powershell" -OutFile 'data-catalog.psm1' -Headers @{"Authorization"="Bearer $authToken"}
Import-Module .\data-catalog.psm1 -Force
Connect-SqlDataCatalog -ServerUrl $CatalogServer -AuthToken $authToken 

#Connect to your Azure Subscription
Connect-AzAccount -Subscription $AzureSub

#Get current active DDM Masks from Azure
$DdmMasks = Get-AzSqlDatabaseDataMaskingRule `
    -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroup `
    -ServerName $ServerName `
    -DatabaseName $DatabaseName
$ListOfDDMColumns = $DdmMasks | ForEach-Object {$_.SchemaName + '.' + $_.TableName + '.' + $_.ColumnName}

#Get columns from Catalog currently marked with "Dynamic Data Masking" as a treatment intent
$CatalogColumns = Get-ClassificationColumn `
    -InstanceName $instance `
    -DatabaseName $DatabaseName | Where-Object {$_.tags.name -eq "Dynamic data masking"} 

#Filter down to a list of columns that need to be masked, that currently aren't configured with DDM
$ColumnsToDDM = $CatalogColumns | Where-Object {($_.SchemaName + '.' + $_.TableName + '.' + $_.ColumnName) -notin $ListOfDDMColumns }


#Set default DDM Masks for identified columns
$ColumnsToDDM | ForEach-Object { `
    New-AzSqlDatabaseDataMaskingRule -ResourceGroupName $ResourceGroup `
                                     -ServerName $ServerName `
                                     -DatabaseName $DatabaseName  `
                                     -SchemaName $_.schemaName `
                                     -TableName $_.tableName `
                                     -ColumnName $_.columnName `
                                     -MaskingFunction "Default"

}

But I have also uploaded it to my GitHub here in case anyone would like to take and adapt as they see fit: https://github.com/ChrisUnwin/PowerShell/blob/master/Demos/Redgate%20Demos/DDMFromCatalog.ps1

And this was the result – here were the two columns I had already being masked:

Customer Firstname and Customer Email with DDM Masks Configured

These were the columns I had marked as Dynamic Data Masking in Data Catalog:

Customer firstname, lastname, street addres and email all marked for DDM in Catalog

and after running the PowerShell it deduced that the delta was street_address and lastname and created the default DDM mask for them in Azure:

All columns now being masked dynamically

Considerations

1 – I have used the default mask in this process, however if you wanted to configure the mask (as per the link to the docs above) to be specific numbers or format you could absolutely do this, simply by modifying the PowerShell to look at the Data Type and then just passing into a different New-AzSqlDatabaseDataMaskingRule for each of those types.

2 – This only applies to Azure SQL DB and does not take into account the considerations when using DDM on say, a 2017 SQL Server Instance running on a VM – however you could use the same approach to pass the columns into some dynamic T-SQL which would in turn run the correct command to add DDM to that/those column(s)

3 – I would still use Static Data Masking (SDM) for non-Production environments, because if anyone bypasses the DDM they will have access to the full data, which we don’t really NEED in less secure non-Prod environments anyway, so Static might well be the way to go!

“But I don’t wanna INSTALL it!”: Data Masker on the fly in Azure DevOps (with an Azure SQL DB)

“There is always a way to go if you look for it.”
Ernest A. Fitzgerald

As many of you know, I really enjoy talking about Data Masking. I fundamentally believe it is an absolutely ESSENTIAL part of Test Data Management and specifically the provisioning of Pre-Production environments. If you hold sensitive PII/PHI/PCI in your Production environments, you have no excuses for porting any of that back into Dev and Test.

I also stand firmly behind the belief (and it is just that, my belief) that masking is much safer than anything you can achieve with encryption or limiting access alone. Static masking, when done correctly, means that even if all other security measures are bypassed, or we accidentally expose data somehow, it doesn’t matter because the PII/PHI has been wiped, but it is still fundamentally useful for development and testing environments.

I’m also a huge proponent of using classification and data masking as part of a DevOps process, and often you’ll find me using Azure DevOps to actually kick off my masking process – but one of the most frequent questions I get is “do I have to install Data Masker somewhere?” and the answer I always have to give is… yes.

When we use SQL Provision to spin up our environments in non-Prod, generally we know they have to be in IaaS VMs or On-Prem, due to the nature of the technology (keep your eyes open on THIS because big changes coming soon *squeals in excitement*) but sometimes we’re working entirely with PaaS DBs and VMs don’t even come into our vocabulary – but we still need them to be masked for non-Prod use.

I have some data in an Azure SQL DB – a copy of DMDatabase (get it from my GitHub):

DM_CUSTOMER table in the DMDatabase

and I would like to get this masked before I create copies of it. Now I have written scripts in the past to make sure that Azure SQL DBs can be masked and then copied into non-Prod environments and you can get those scripts here, and you could easily wrap something like the below INTO a script like that – but much of the work I’ve done on this always involves having Data Masker installed somewhere and invoked on that machine – a VM, my laptop, whatever.

So, how do we avoid having to install Data Masker each time?

Data Masker for SQL Server does not (at time of writing) have publicly available a docker container or method for installing using Choco or something like that – once we do, trust me, I’ll be blogging about it A LOT as I will be very excited. But there is an install file available: https://download.red-gate.com/installers/DataMaskerforSQLServer/ and this might be enough.

The Process

Initially I created a Masking Set locally for the DMDatabase copy in Azure, it was nice and simple just masking a few of the fields on the CUSTOMER table:

It relies on SQL auth for the connection and I’m remembering the credentials, though these could be subbed in later on using the PARFILE (documentation on that here).

Next I put this masking set into a newly created Azure DevOps Git repo, which I cloned down onto my local machine – and then committed and pushed my changes up into Azure DevOps:

Now that this was all in ADO, it was time to set up a pipeline for it – so let’s jump into some YAML! Now, Data Masker currently needs to run on a Windows machine so we’ll set the pool to Windows-Latest:

trigger:
- main

pool:
  vmImage: windows-latest

The next step is to grab the installer – which I know I can easily do with PowerShell. I’m sure you could be more clever about this, but with limited time I chose the most recent version and hard coded that in to a PowerShell Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet:

- task: PowerShell@2
  inputs:
    targetType: 'inline'
    script: |
      $source = 'https://download.red-gate.com/installers/DataMaskerforSQLServer/2021-03-15/DataMaskerforSQLServer.exe'
      New-Item -ItemType directory -Path C:\download
      $destination = 'C:\download\DataMaskerforSQLServer.exe'
      Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $source -OutFile $destination
      New-Item -ItemType directory -Path C:\download\DMlogs
  displayName: 'Download Data Masker'

This PowerShell task is going to grab the most recent exe for Data Masker and pull it down into C:\download on the hosted VM we’re using for the pipeline and it’s also going to create a directory for the Data Masker logs as well (if you wanted to extend the YAML at the end to wrap these logs up and publish them as a result of the pipeline masking, then go for it and tweet me to let me know!)

Next we have to extract and install Data Masker from that download, which is fairly easy to do with a cmd call:

- task: CmdLine@2
  inputs:
    script: |
      "C:\download\DataMaskerforSQLServer.exe" products "Data Masker for SQL Server" log c:\download temp c:\download /IAgreeToTheEula RG_LICESE=%RGLICENSE%
  displayName: 'Install DMS Headlessly'

Note I’m using the guidance from this page, making sure to accept the EULA and I’m passing in my Redgate License as a variable, that I have specified for the pipeline and kept secret. This will put Data Masker in the default location in C:\Program Files\… and means we will then be able to call it. I do however need to make sure that this now works. So I saved my pipeline and ran it to see what happened:

Fabulous, that all works nicely. Now to pass the DMSMaskSet file to Data Masker and get it to run – ah but I forgot, I’m going to need a PARFILE as per the cmdline documentation that specifies where the files etc. are for the run. So I create my PARFILE.txt as such:

MASKINGSET=C:\download\DMDB_MaskingTime.DMSMaskSet
LOGFILEDIR=C:\download\DMlogs
DATASETSDIR=C:\Program Files\Red Gate\Data Masker for SQL Server 7\DataSets 
REPORTSDIR=C:\download\DMlogs
INTERIM_REPORTS=false

As you can see, very simple. But to make sure these files are “simply” in the right folder, and because I don’t have time to explore how I could pass an environment variable into the .txt file itself, I’m going to add a quick file copy task to make sure that my masking set and PARFILE both make it into that location:

- task: CopyFiles@2
  inputs:
    SourceFolder: '$(Build.Repository.LocalPath)'
    Contents: '**'
    TargetFolder: 'C:\download'
  displayName: 'Copy files from working directory'

Of course now that we have Data Masker installed on the pipeline VM, the masking set AND the PARFILE… let’s get masking!

- task: CmdLine@2
  inputs:
    script: '"C:\Program Files\Red Gate\Data Masker for SQL Server 7\DataMaskerCmdLine.exe" PARFILE=C:\download\PARFILE.txt'
  displayName: 'Run Data Masker'

I agree the command is now less than impressive given all the prep work, but when you run all of this in it’s entirety…

Big success! But let’s check the data of course and make sure it is as we expect:

It all works, Lynne has been masked to Muna (and the rest has been masked too!), and I didn’t need to have Data Masker installed on a VM in my environment, with an Azure DevOps self hosted agent to run it – I could just do it programmatically. #Winning.

I’ll put the full YAML below however some caveats:

  • You cannot run this pipeline a LOT in a short space of time, I found that out. The RedGate downloads page is not particularly designed for this process, so it should probably be run sparingly otherwise the pipeline times out because the server, by way of balancing, will prevent you from pulling the file too often.
  • You will need to update the PowerShell step reasonably often if you want the DMS most recent installer, or make it more futureproof to grab the latest version – I just didn’t investigate that.
  • Data Masker is dependent on the power of the machine it is running on in MANY ways and Azure DevOps pipeline VMs are not particularly the most powerful beasts in the world – so if you have a lot of masking that needs doing, I would be weary of this method and might stick to an Application Server VM you’ve got hanging around, just in case.
  • This is likely to change a lot in the future so may not be relevant when you’re reading it after a few months – so before implementing anything like this, if it’s been a few months, contact me or Redgate and just confirm that there isn’t some better way of doing this, if I haven’t already blogged it!

Thanks for stopping by and have a great week!

Full YAML:

trigger:
- main

pool:
  vmImage: windows-latest

steps:
- task: PowerShell@2
  inputs:
    targetType: 'inline'
    script: |
      $source = 'https://download.red-gate.com/installers/DataMaskerforSQLServer/2021-03-15/DataMaskerforSQLServer.exe'
      New-Item -ItemType directory -Path C:\download
      $destination = 'C:\download\DataMaskerforSQLServer.exe'
      Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $source -OutFile $destination
      New-Item -ItemType directory -Path C:\download\DMlogs
  displayName: 'Download Data Masker'

- task: CmdLine@2
  inputs:
    script: |
      "C:\download\DataMaskerforSQLServer.exe" products "Data Masker for SQL Server" log c:\download temp c:\download /IAgreeToTheEula RG_LICESE=%RGLICENSE%
  displayName: 'Install DMS Headlessly'

- task: CopyFiles@2
  inputs:
    SourceFolder: '$(Build.Repository.LocalPath)'
    Contents: '**'
    TargetFolder: 'C:\download'
  displayName: 'Copy files from working directory'

- task: CmdLine@2
  inputs:
    script: '"C:\Program Files\Red Gate\Data Masker for SQL Server 7\DataMaskerCmdLine.exe" PARFILE=C:\download\PARFILE.txt'
  displayName: 'Run Data Masker'

Automated Dev Database Branch-Switching with AzureSQL, PowerShell and GitHooks

“Keep it simple, stupid!”
– My year 12 & 13 English Lit. Teacher

Recently I’ve been fascinated with something really cool. A couple of my colleagues at Redgate wrote a GitHook which allows you to easily switch branches using Redgate SQL Clone. You can see the hook here with full instructions – and I thought it was pretty neat.

But it got me thinking – I’ve posted a lot about when people are using just Azure SQL DBs (PaaS), about Masking and DB Change Automation, but when you’re using AzureSQL for Dev and Test DBs as well as Prod, you still don’t have the same agility one would expect from a local copy, like a clone.

But, the above GitHook leverages PowerShell (among some other fancy wizardry) so, what if we could do this exact same thing, using the PowerShell Az module to dynamically create and switch Azure SQL DBs in our own private resource groups every time we checkout a branch?

my hero academia wtf GIF by Funimation

I don’t imagine it would be fast because I’m restricted to using very low tier SQL DBs by my tiny allowance of (as Kendra Little calls them) “Azure Bucks”, but it should absolutely be possible!

So I decided to write a PowerShell script to do just that.

The first question I had to come up with an answer to was, how do I replace the Clone “Image” in this process, because I need something that is effectively a copy of our Production (or as near as possible) environment so we have something to base EVERY copy from – so I created the idea of a Golden Copy within the script; effectively this golden copy could be created by copying masking and copying back down from Production using something like Redgate Data Masker and my scripts here in GitHub but as a stop-gap, if it doesn’t find one in the Resource Group and Server you select, it will simply create one from your Dev DB. Best answer I could think of, you’re welcome to improve it!

All that remained was effectively to go through and just mimic the functionality of the Clone script but using Az: so if you are switching to a new branch where you don’t already have an existing Dev DB, then you get a new copy of Golden. If you’re switching to a branch you’ve checked out before, it renames the DBs to swap you back to the correct branch.

Here is an empty AzureSQL DB called DMDatabase_Dev:

When I now issue the git checkout “feature/newfeature” command it asks me to sign in to my Azure account:

and then gets to work:

And… that was it really.

I now have an Azure SQL DB called DMDatabase_Dev_master as I switched from the master branch, and I have a branch new DMDatabase_Dev DB that I can use for my featurebranch. You’ll notice I didn’t include -b in my git command, let’s assume a colleague is already working on this branch. I can now just update my copy (of my golden copy) with their work:

And we’re good to go!

But now if I switch back to my main branch, the object is gone and I can carry on with work on this branch:

It was really straightforward I can’t believe I haven’t seen this in use in more places, but hey guess what? The PowerShell is yours right here if you want it:

https://github.com/ChrisUnwin/PowerShell/blob/master/Demos/Redgate%20Demos/GitHookAzureSQL.ps1

The pre-requisites for it are:

  • You should have a Dev DB and you should update the values at the top of the script with the Dev DB name, server and resource group it is in
  • The script make reference to and creates a Golden copy DB so that you have something you should always be creating from, for consistency – so when you get started, create your own “Golden copy” back from Test/UAT or something if you can – maybe using the script mentioned above – it should be the name of your Dev DB appended with “_Golden”
  • If you want to change how it is authenticated so you don’t have to enter your credentials each time, then go for it – this was just the simplest method for me (and it’s currently 11:05pm so I’m going to bed!)

Feel free to improve it, I’m sure there are plenty improvements that can be made, but it’s a starter for 10 for anyone out there just getting started with development in Azure SQL. Plus it’s kinda neat!

3 methods for seeding test data during CI builds with Flyway

“It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

EDIT: Modified 23/12/2020 to include updates to Flyway in v7, method 4 below

Can you tell I’m loving Flyway at the moment? Well I am. It’s JUST SO GOOD! Honestly there are so many things you can do with it! Don’t know what I’m talking about? Check out my posts on xRDBMS DevOps with Flyway and tSQLt unit tests with Flyway and you’ll see what I mean!

As a result of the above posts though I was asked a question that I had to think about for a little bit before having the best possible answer, how can we seed some testing data INTO the build database so that we can run some meaningful tests against it?

This makes perfect sense to me, but there’s also a few different ways to do this – so let’s go fly(way)!

flying i believe i can fly GIF

1 – Test Data Migration Scripts

In my previous posts on Flyway (above) I talked about having an entirely separate build folder present within the repository, and a folder of test migrations alongside our schema migrations – I called these the Build_Config folder, (containing the build configuration file) and the Test_Migrations folder (unsurprisingly containing testing migrations) in the _Migrations location:

I was using the same build config for 2 purposes; 1) to build the schema migrations from the base version, by passing it the Schema_Migrations location dynamically and 2) then building the tSQLt framework and testing objects by passing it the Test_Migrations location dynamically.

This actually worked surprisingly well, but even beyond this – the same method can be repurposed, or added to, by augmenting your testing scripts and adding a data insertion task (as an additional script or group of scripts). In my folder, I can simply add a migration like this:

Because of course I like dogs.

lana del rey yes GIF

and once pushed to the repository and the build has run we should be able to verify our testing data is present:

A bonus win for this step of course, is that where Devs have their own Flyway config files locally for their development databases they could also overwrite this behavior and point the testing and/or data scripts at their own database so they have some seed data to work with too!

2 – Add a data generation step to the pipeline

There are SO MANY technologies out on the inter-webs for generating data. SO MANY. Many of them also have a command line or PowerShell module that we can use to easily invoke them against a target, especially if that target is going to be persistent like my Flyway Azure SQL Build DBs!

Because I have access to it and because I’m using essentially SQL Server DBs, I could easily use Redgate SQL Data Generator – but to get the data you need you could use anything from DBATools Data Generation (also SQL Server) to FillDB for MySQL (which looks awesome and you could easily use this for Step 1 above too!)

There are numerous ways to invoke tools and applications and fortunately good CI/CD tools like Azure DevOps offer multiple ways to, for instance, run PowerShell or CLI steps from within the pipeline – so we could easily invoke SQL Data Generator on a VM or physical machine we have an Azure DevOps agent on – but this thinking also opens up the possibility of using something like Chocolatey to dynamically install the software on the Azure DevOps hosted pool VM during build (for the Redgate tools at the moment I suppose you’d need a Windows VM).

sassy pants chocolate GIF

I will be writing a future blog post about this step because it sounds _very_ interesting, but I’m not sure yet what can be done specifically using Chocolatey or if I’ll have to look elsewhere, although I have read this post in the past (thanks Paul!) detailing limitations and a great workaround using Azure DevOps, so it’s likely that’ll be my first port of call!

Just to give you an idea of end result with SQL Data Generator specifically though:

3 – Use existing data, don’t generate

Ok this one is going to be controversial already, I can tell! Let’s all stay calm!

happy chill GIF

The best data to be tested is our data. What we have in Production is what will have these changes deployed to it… eventually! So shouldn’t we just test against that? Well. Maybe, maybe not depending on what is in there.

There’s a few methods to achieve this – my personal favorite would be to use a SQL Clone, spin that up on a build VM rather than using an Azure SQL DB, and we can have all the data in an instant. Of course if we hold any sensitive PII/PHI then we should ensure that is protected first!

Of course there are lots of other options, like restoring a backup or spinning up a container etc. and these can all just be a stage in the YAML file before invoking Flyway but the point is, if we use an existing copy of our Prod database from some source or another, it will have 2 things we really care about:

  1. Data. Ready to go, ready to test, ready to give us the best possible insight into our changes.
  2. The flyway_schema_history table. Instead of running EVERY migration we’ve ever written, which could take a while for a large team, we run only the latest migrations to check that they would deploy happily to the Production target.

To get this stage to work though, you would need to do a couple of things differently:

  1. The build DB would have to be created from the clone/backup/other every time instead of simply cleaning the schema down.
  2. You would need to remove the Flyway Clean step from the pipeline in my previous post, because it would otherwise drop all the tables (and then we wouldn’t have any data!)
  3. By extension, this also makes the callback to remove the tSQLt objects void, so you can remove that too.

4 (Bonus Method) – Script Migrations

In Flyway v7 the team added the ability to also run script Migrations and Callbacks which mean it is possible to invoke .ps1, .bat, .cmd, .sh, .bash, and .py files as part of the version control > build and migration process.

This means that you can include a script to invoke any loading or processing of data you may prefer – you could invoke a data generation utility, data masking and of course anything else that can be invoked with these file formats. A good example of this might be calling Data Generator as above, or you could use DBATools, DTM Data Generator or even a more platform agnostic approach by using a Hazy generator to produce and then load an incredibly realistic data set.

Conclusion

There are a lot of different ways to generate data, you can generate completely synthetic data, you can mask data or use Prod data, it’s up to you! Ultimately it will just for another part of your pipeline – just be careful of ordering! You don’t want to try generating data into a table that hasn’t been built yet.

Respect your YAML file and you’ll get schema, data and unit tests and this will lead to one thing. Greater insight, earlier.

thumbs up GIF

xRDBMS Database Continuous Integration with Flyway, Azure DevOps and Docker… the simple way.

“Some people try to make everything complicated, be the person who tries to make everything simple.”
Dave Waters

Simplicity is in my blood. That’s not to say I am ‘simple’ in the sense I cannot grasp more than the most basic concepts, but more that I am likely to grasp more complex problems and solutions when they are phrased in simple ways.

This stems from my love of teaching others (on the rare occasion it falls to me to do so), where I find the moment that everything just ‘clicks’ and the realization comes over them to be possibly one of the most satisfying moments one can enjoy in life.

shocked star trek GIF

Now recently I’ve been enjoying getting my head around Flyway – an open source JDBC based migrations tool that brings the power of schema versioning and deployments together with the agility that developers need to focus on innovation in Development. There’s something about Flyway that just… ‘clicks’.

It doesn’t really matter what relational database you’re using; MySQL, IBM DB2, even SAP HANA! You can achieve at least the core tenants of database DevOps with this neat and simple little command line tool – there’s not even an installer, you just have to unzip!

Now I’ve had a lot of fun working with Flyway so far and, thanks to a few people (Kendra, Julia – i’m looking at you both!) I have been able to wrap my head around it to, I would say, a fair standard. Caveat on that – being a pure SQL person please don’t ask me about Java based migrations, I’m not quite there yet!! But there is one thing that I kept asking myself:

“When I’m talking to colleagues and customers about Database DevOps, I’m always talking about the benefits of continuous integration; building the database from scratch to ensure that everything builds and validates…” etc. etc. so why haven’t I really come across this with Flyway yet?

think tom hanks GIF by The Late Show With Stephen Colbert

Probably for a few reasons. You can include Flyway as a plugin in your Maven and Gradle configurations, so people writing java projects already get that benefit. It can easily form part Flyway itself by virtue is simply small incremental scripts and developers can go backwards and forwards however and as many times as they like with the Flyway Migrate, Undo and Clean commands, so is there really a need for a build? And most importantly, Flyway’s API just allows you to build it in. So naturally you’re building WITH the application.

But naturally when you’re putting your code with other people’s code, things have to be tested and verified, and I like to do this in isolation too – especially for databases that are decoupled from the application, or if you have a number of micro-service style databases you’d want to test all in parallel etc. it’s a great way to shift left. So I started asking myself if there was some way I could implement a CI build using Flyway in Azure DevOps, like I would any of the other database tooling I use on a regular basis? Below you’ll find the product of my tinkering, and a whole heap of help from Julia and Kendra, without whom I would still be figuring out what Baseline does!

Option 1) The simplest option – cmdline

Flyway can be called via the command line and it doesn’t get more simple than that.

You can pass any number of arguments and switches to Flyways command line, including specifying what config files it’s going to be using – which means that all you have to do, is unzip the Flyway components on a dedicated build server (VM or on-prem) and then, after refreshing the migrations available, invoke the command line using Azure DevOps pipelines (or another CI tool) to run Flyway with the commands against a database on the build server (or somewhere accessible to the build server) and Bingo!

No Idea Build GIF by Rooster Teeth

And that’s all there is to it! You get to verify that all of the migrations up to the very latest in your VCS will run, and even if you don’t have the VERY base version as a baseline migration, you can still start with a copy of the database – you could even use a Clone for that!

But yes, this does require somewhere for Flyway to exist prior to us running with our migrations… wouldn’t it be even easier if we could do it without even having to unzip Flyway first?

Option 2) Also simple, but very cool! Flyway with Docker

Did you know that Flyway has it’s own docker image? No? Well it does!* Not only that but we can map our own version controlled Migration scripts and Config files to the container so that, if it can point at a database, you sure as heck know it’s going to migrate to it!

*Not sure what the heck all of this Docker/Container stuff is? You’re not alone! Check out this great video on all things containers from The Simple Engineer!

This was the method I tried, and it all started with putting a migration into Version Control. Much like I did for my post on using SQL Change Automation with Azure SQL DB – I set up a repo in Azure DevOps, cloned it down to my local machine and I added a folder for the migrations:

Into this I proceeded to add my base script for creating the DMDatabase (the database I use for EVERYTHING, for which you can find the scripts here):

Once I had included my migration I did the standard

Git add .
Git commit -m "Here is some code"
Git push

and I had a basis from which to work.

Next step then was making sure I had a database to work with. Now the beauty of Flyway means that it can easily support 20+ RDBMS’ so I was like a child at a candy store! I didn’t know what to pick!

For pure ease and again, simplicity, I went for good ol’ SQL Server – or to be precise, I created an Azure SQL Database (at the basic tier too so it’s only costing £3 per month!):

Now here’s where it gets customizable. You don’t NEED to actually even pass in a whole config file to this process. Because the Flyway container is going to spin up everything that would come with an install of Flyway, you can pass it switches to override the default behavior specified in the config file. You can adapt this either by hard-coding strings or by using Environment Variables alongside the native switches – this means you could pass in everything you might need securely through Azure Pipeline’s own methods.

I, on the other hand, was incredibly lazy and decided to use the same config file I use for my Dev environment, but I swapped out the JDBC connection to instead be my Build database:

I think saved this new conf file in my local repo under a folder named Build Configuration – in case I want to add any logic later on to include in the build (like the tSQLt framework and tests! Hint Hint!)

This means that I would only need to specify 2 things as variables, the location of my SQL migrations, and the config file. So the next challenge was getting the docker container up and running, which fortunately it’s very easy to do in Azure Pipelines, here was the entirety of the YAML to run Flyway in a container (and do nothing with it yet):

trigger:
- master

pool:
  vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

steps:
- task: DockerInstaller@0
  inputs:
    dockerVersion: '17.09.0-ce'
  displayName: 'Install Docker'

- task: Bash@3
  inputs:
    targettype: 'inline'
    script: docker run flyway/flyway -v
  displayName: 'Run Flyway'

So, on any changes to the main branch we’ll be spinning up a Linux VM, grabbing Docker and firing up the Flyway container. That’s it. Simple.

So now I just have to pass in my config file, which is already in my ‘build config’ folder, and my migrations which are in my VCS root. To do this it was a case of mapping where Azure DevOps stores the files from Git during the build to the containers own mount location in which it expects to find the relevant conf and sql files. Fortunately Flyway and Docker have some pretty snazzy and super clear documentation on this – so it was a case of using:

-v [my sql files in vcs]:/flyway/sql

as part of the run – though I had to ensure I also cleaned the build environment first, otherwise it would just be like deploying to a regular database, and we want to make sure we can build from the ground up every single time! This lead to me having the following environment variables:

As, rather helpfully, all of our files from Git are copied to the working directory during the build and we can use the environment variable $(Build.Repository.LocalPath) to grab them! This lead to me updating my YAML to actually do some Flyway running when we spin up the container!

trigger:
- master

pool:
  vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

steps:
- task: DockerInstaller@0
  inputs:
    dockerVersion: '17.09.0-ce'
  displayName: 'Install Docker'

- task: Bash@3
  inputs:
    targettype: 'inline'
    script: docker run -v $(FLYWAY_LOCATIONS):/flyway/sql -v $(FLYWAY_CONFIG_FILES):/flyway/conf flyway/flyway clean -enterprise
  displayName: 'Clean build schema'

- task: Bash@3
  inputs:
    targettype: 'inline'
    script: docker run -v $(FLYWAY_LOCATIONS):/flyway/sql -v $(FLYWAY_CONFIG_FILES):/flyway/conf flyway/flyway migrate -enterprise
  displayName: 'Run flyway for schema'

Effectively, this will spin up the VM in ADO, download and install Docker, fire up the Flyway container and then 1) clean the target schema (my Azure SQL DB in this case) and 2) then migrate all of the migrations scripts in the repo up to the latest version – and this all seemed to work great!*

*Note: I have an enterprise Flyway licenses which enables loads of great features and support, different version comparisons can be found described here.

So now, whenever I add Flyway SQL migrations to my repo as part of a branch, I can create a PR, merge them back into Trunk and trigger an automatic build against my Flyway build DB in Azure SQL:

Conclusion

Getting up and running with Flyway is so very very easy, anyone can do it – it’s part of the beauty of the technology, but it turns out getting the build up and running too, when you’re not just embedding it directly within your application, is just as straightforward and it was a great learning curve for me!

The best part about this though – is that everything above can be achieved using pretty much any relational database management system you would like, either via the command line and a dedicated build server, or via the Docker container at build time. So get building!

ready lets go GIF

(SQL) Change ALL the Azure SQL Database Automation!

“But I can hardly sit still. I keep fidgeting, crossing one leg and then the other. I feel like I could throw off sparks, or break a window–maybe rearrange all the furniture.”
Raymond Carver

I understand that starting off a blog about Azure SQL Database with the above quote is a little weird, but honestly I’m _really_ excited about what I’m about to tell you.

***Note before starting: This blog post assumes you’re familiar with the concepts of Database Source Control, CI and CD, Azure SQL Database and pipelines within Azure DevOps, otherwise here be dragons.***

I am a huge fan of SQL Change Automation – mostly because of the migrations functionality. In my mind it represents an ideal workflow for making complex SQL Server database changes. If you’re not sure about the different models (State, Migrations, Hybrid), take a look at my blog post from last week here! But until this time it has had one thing that I could not easily do with it… Platform as a Service, Azure SQL DB.

Now don’t get me wrong, SQL Change Automation could easily deploy to Azure SQL Database but I had a problem. The words:

Chris how do we benefit from the migrations approach and put the shadow database and build db in Azure SQL too? We don’t have any local instances or VMs we can use for this and Dev, Test and Prod are all in PaaS!”

elicited this response:

cry crying GIF

But. No. Longer.

Now for those of you who don’t know, the _SHADOW_ database that SQL Change Automation creates is effectively a schema and static data only copy of your database, and it is dropped and built each time you verify, to ensure that all of the migrations run successfully and you can effectively check your work and shift the build left (!!), before you even check into source control.

This shadow database and the build database shared one thing in common and that was that you couldn’t build them in Azure SQL DB, which left 2 choices:

  • Use an instance of SQL Server. Developer for the shadow locally maybe; a VM in Azure or on-prem hosted instance for building
  • [For build specifically] Use localDB. Not advisable if your database contains any objects not supported by localDB because (juuuust in case you didn’t know) it is SQL Server Express.

But on May 12th 2020 (and I only found out about this like 2 weeks ago) the SQL Change Automation team at Redgate released version 4.2.20133 of the plugin for SSMS which included a few super cool things like additional Azure SQL support and the Custom Provisioning Scripts feature.*

excited excitement GIF

Now this is great because not only can we now easily create SQL Clones to be used as the development source (and I’ll blog about THAT a little later) but of course you can use it to use an Azure SQL DB for the shadow AND to use a persistent Azure SQL DB for the CI build as well!

Now unfortunately Kendra kinda beat me to the punch here and she produced a fabulous 3 part video series you can watch on using SQL Change Automation solely with Azure SQL DB, and you can view those here if you don’t want to see me try it out:

Getting set up

The first thing I did was make sure that I had all of the necessary environments to try this out – I created 3 Azure SQL Databases to mimic Development, Build and Production environments on 2 separate Prod and Non Prod Azure SQL Servers. I ran the DMDatabase prep scripts (you can find these here) to setup Dev_Chris and Production, but left BuildDB empty.

Next It was time to create my project, so I hopped over into Azure DevOps and created a new project, initialized it with a README and then Cloned it down onto my local environment:

Everything was ready to go so it was time to create my project!

Setting up SQL Change Automation in SSMS

*cough* or if you’re me, update it first because you’re on a REALLY old version *cough*

Then I hit “Create a New Project” and it allowed me to just specify the connection string to the Dev Azure SQL DB and the project location was the checked-out local repo:

Didn’t change any of the options because I’m a rebel and I didn’t feel like filtering anything out! But of course now comes the fun bit… the baseline. I chose my production Azure SQL DB as it’s my only upstream DB at this point, and it’s time to hit “Create Project”.

…and Huzzah! It’s worked and we’re all good!

excited andrew garfield GIF by The Academy Awards

Now… that’s actually not the best bit! The reason why Andrew there is clapping so hard? Well that little piece of magic has happened in the background! A Shadow database has actually been created for me against my azure server automatically! This is done by using the connection string that is used for dev!

Now… one thing to check, and I didn’t think to do this, but you can specify the connection string in the SQL Change Automation user file but I just left mine for a bit not realizing it created an Azure SQL DB for the Shadow that was CONSIDERABLY higher tier than my dev environment (bye bye Azure credit!), but fortunately I was able to scale it down quickly to basic and that has stuck, but be warned!

So I did what all ‘good devs’ would do now… I committed and pushed my initial commit directly to my main branch! (Don’t tell my boss!)

and safely sat my Database in Azure DevOps:

Setting up the build and deployment stages

This bit was actually just as easy. I used to hate YAML but thanks to a certain (wonderful) Alex Yates I jumped in anyway and it turned out to be just fine!

I created a new basic YAML file within Azure DevOps (and used the assistant to just auto populate the Redgate defaults, if you don’t know YAML or what it can do already, there’s a really good MS article here) and committed it to the main branch again (whoopsie) and the only component was the SQL Change Automation plugin I pulled in from the Azure DevOps marketplace, and I configured the build to target my “nonprod” server and the Build DB I had created previously.

On saving and running the pipeline succeeded!

All that was left to do was to create a Release Pipeline. So naturally, I jumped straight in and created a new pipeline, and I started with an empty job and called it Production*note* make sure you also choose your Build artifact before configuring your release stage too by clicking the Add an Artifact option!:

I added the SQL Change Automation: Release step to the agent job (note because this is all hosted, I’m using an Azure DevOps hosted agent to do this step):

Now you’ll need to add 2 stages (both the SQL Change Automation: Release plugin) at this point, a “Create Release” and a “Deploy from Database Release Artifact” because one will look at the target and figure everything out for you, and you’ll be able to review exactly what will be deployed, and the other will actually _do_ the deployment:

From here you just have to specify the options available, like in this wonderful walk-through here from the fabulous Chris Kerswell of DBAle fame! For me, this was simply targeting my Production Azure SQL Database.

You’ll definitely want to use the project variables to pick up the right package, and also leave the export path blank in both steps for now:

You can Clone the step by right clicking instead if you want to which will preserve all the connections you’ve already provided! Then once it’s all pointed at the right place, save and queue the release!

And of course, we were successful:

and then finally with a couple of triggers set to automatically build and deploy I made a change to my Contacts table in my Azure SQL Dev DB and a few minutes later, thanks to Azure DevOps and Redgate SQL Change Automation the very same change appeared in Production, with no reliance on anything other than Azure SQL DB and SQL Change Automation:

Before the DevOps process on Dev, ready for a migration to be generated
After: Automatic post-build deployment of the new column to the Production Azure SQL Database

Conclusion

If you have all of your databases in Azure SQL Database**, fear not because SQL Change Automation to the rescue! You can very easily set up and configure a pipeline in Azure DevOps or indeed any pipeline of your choice, but it’s never been easier to persist development changes all the way through to Production in a low risk, incremental, “DevOps” way!

—NOTES—

*An important word from the release notes: Note that it is still generally recommended to locate the shadow database locally where possible as that will usually result in a faster database connection. The default CreateDatabase.sql and DropDatabase.sql scripts can be altered to improve performance or implement custom provisioning logic.

**If you have all of your Databases in Azure and you need them masked for Dev/Test too, check out this previous blog post in which I outlined how to do that using Azure DevOps too!

Azure DevOps Masking a.k.a “point, no click”

“[My] kids haven’t responded to my GDPR requests so I don’t think I’m legally allowed to tell them when dinner’s on the table.”
@mrdaveturner

Ah masking. You would have thought I’d be sick of it by now, no? No, fortunately now, more so than ever, I find myself answering question after question and tackling use-case after use-case. So when I was asked this week:

“Chris, is there a way for us to call Data Masker for SQL Server directly from Azure DevOps?”

I thought to myself, well that sounds easy enough… and it was! I know what you’re thinking, c’mon Chris, surely there is more to it? But no, it’s actually pretty straight forward!

I pointed them at the PowerShell module and cmdlets for SQL Provision and the Azure DevOps plugin to automate all of their Provisioning and Masking process, thinking all the while “pffft, they could have made this harder!” and then…

“No sorry Chris, is there a way for us to call JUST Data Masker for SQL Server directly from Azure DevOps?”

Ah! Now that’s an interesting one!

#1 Figure out where you want Data Masking to run in your process

This empty Azure deployment stage looks good enough for now! If you wanted to chain other processes either side of it, that’s cool too! Maybe you have your own provisioning process in place and you want to point Data Masker at it to sanitize it? Makes sense to me! For now I’m going to stick with a single agent job for simplicity.

#2 Figure out what is actually going to run Data Masker

Data Masker is a client install and as such will need to be installed on a *gasp* actual machine!

No but seriously, any server you have lying around, physical or VM will do the trick as long as it meets these requirements. Now this Server/VM will need to have an Azure DevOps agent on it already, which of course is the ideal candidate for being the “thing” that calls Data Masker – this could be the Staging/Non-Functional/Pre-Prod environment also of course, so you could copy down PROD and then immediately invoke masking.

#3 Call the command line from Azure DevOps

In your pipeline steps you can specify the calling of an executable on the machine where the agent resides. Fortunately Data Masker has a wonderful command line available that you can call, you can read all about it here: https://documentation.red-gate.com/dms/data-masker-help/general-topics/about-command-line-automation

The PARFILE you could of course dynamically replace with variables so that it only calls the relevant parameter file for that particular database as well, a nice benefit!

My PARFILE just simply looked like this:

It was calling a local Data Masker set “AzureFun” – now the thing to bear in mind is that Data Masker will run with the Windows authentication credentials that are being run as by the Azure DevOps agent, unless you specify otherwise. In this case because the Azure DevOps agent has the correct permissions to update the databases on this instance anyway I’m fine to use Windows Authentication:

Conclusion

It’s very easy to simply call the command line of Data Masker for SQL Server directly from Azure DevOps, does this same approach work from other CI/CD tools? If they can call executables on the target server then absolutely! So it’s very easily included in the process – you just have to think about where Data Masker is installed and what credentials you’re using for it!

Bonus Point – what about if it’s all Azure SQL Database?

You had to do it didn’t you, you had to say it!

“But Chris, now we know we can call this all from Azure DevOps, what if we wanted to mask and copy Azure SQL Databases into Dev/Test etc.?”

Well actually the good thing is, it’s also pretty similar! When you’re connecting Data Masker to an Azure SQL DB you only need to specify this in the connections in the controller. Again, authentication will likely have to be SQL Auth at this point, and you need to be in Cloud mode, and I’d recommend setting the connection timeout to 10s rather than the standard 5s, but it can still be called as normal from the PARFILE:

So the Data Masker element is reasonably straight forward – that’s the good news. But the thing you REALLY need to stop and think about is:

Where are our Dev and Test copies going to BE?

Option #1: If they’re going to be on VMs or local dev and test servers / developer machines then you could follow a similar approach to one I laid out in this blog post for Redgate in which you create a BACPAC file and split it out on premise before importing it and then provisioning from there. And you could use this code in my Github to achieve something very similar. Caveat: I am no PowerShell guru, who do you think I am? Rob Sewell? Chrissy LeMaire? No. Sadly not. So you can build your own logic around my code though, have at it, I don’t mind! ^_^

Option #2: Keeping everything in Azure. You can copy databases around in Azure and it seems to work pretty well! So I wrote this PowerShell (also in my GitHub for y’all) to effectively copy a PROD DB into the same resource group, mask it and then copy it across to a Dev/Test resource group, dropping the temp copy so as not to incur lots of extra Azure costs (this is just one of the methods I’ve seen people use, again it’s up to you!) – again, see the caveat in option #1 above for my statement on PowerShell! The good thing is, you can use the ‘&’ simply from PowerShell to call Data Masker’s command line.

Either of these options can be run from Azure DevOps also as part of your provisioning or working processes, but instead of including a call to the command line, you can run a fun PowerShell script instead:

Second Conclusion *sigh*

There are lots of ways to get what you need into Dev and Test, but these copies should be masked if they contain personal, identifying information. There are some methods above but there are plenty of others out there on the internet and if you’re not sure about getting started with data masking; try my post here – happy masking!