Automating best practice checks at build time using the SQL Code Analysis cmdline (and failing the build)

Quality is not an act, it is a habit.”
Aristotle

I’ve always been thoroughly impressed with the static analysis code report that you can get from SQL Change Automation when it creates a Release Artifact prior to deploying upstream, and the fact we can use SQL Prompt to carry out on-the-fly static analysis as we write our T-SQL code in SSMS, but it has always struck me as odd that there doesn’t appear to be a way to include these checks at build time.

This seems like the perfect opportunity to build the DB from scratch (check), run unit tests (check) and check no poor coding practices have been checked in onto our branch (uh… not check?)

Enter SQL Code Analysis!

Don’t know what I’m talking about? I got you: https://documentation.red-gate.com/scg/sql-code-analysis-documentation/code-analysis-for-sql-server-command-line but to be fair I didn’t know this was a thing myself until yesterday!

One of my esteemed colleagues asked this question yesterday an being me I just couldn’t wait to have a go – is there a way to include this cmdline as part of an Azure DevOps build and FAIL the build if issues are found?

First things’ first: How does it work?

I downloaded the command line and it was pretty simple to get my head around. you can use windows or sql auth, you can point it at a scripts folder or a live DB and you can output the results to xml, html or the console if you’d like. Simple.

SqlCodeGuard.Cmd.exe /s:localhost\TOOLS /d:DMDatabase2019 /out:helloworld.html
SQL Code Analysis Console Output: 4 issues with the DMDatabase2019 found
Code Analysis HTML Output: 4 issues found with the DMDatabase2019, but much easier to read this time

Next: Wrap it in some PowerShell

I am neither a windows command line nor a PowerShell guru, but my first instinct when I’m going to include something like this in a build or deployment is to use PowerShell. It’s easy and mostly non-confusing to pass variables through the pipeline to PowerShell, easy to customize scripts and include if/else logic and to capture exit codes.

So I wrapped the cmdline call in some PowerShell (take it, it’s all yours!) that made it easier to:

  • Import the XML output generated by Code Analysis
  • Count the number of issues generated
  • Exit with error code 1 (failure) if any issues were found
  • Exit clean with 0 if no issues are found
#Set Path for Code Guard, server/instance, database and output location for XML
$codeGuardPath = "C:\Users\chris.unwin\Downloads\SCG-2019-10-17-11-40-22-46"
$server = "REDACTED"
$database = "REDACTED"
$outLocation = "$codeGuardPath\myoutput.xml"
#$user = "REDACTED"
#$password = "REDACTED"

#Invoke SQL Code Guard against the DB (could be the Build Database)
& "$codeGuardPath\SqlCodeGuard.Cmd.exe" /s:$server /d:$database /out:$outLocation #/u:$user /p:$password

#Import output xml file and count contents
$blah = [xml](Get-Content -Path $outLocation)
$files = $blah.SelectNodes('//file') #Objects with issues
$issues = $blah.SelectNodes('//file/issue') #Total issues themselves

#If number of issues > zero, exit with non-zero exit code and output list of affected objects
if ( $issues.count -gt 0 ) {

    "You have: " + $files.count + " objects, containing a total of: " + $issues.count + " issues."
    $files.fullname
    "Please review the xml output for more information."

    exit 1

}

#Else continue with no issues
else {

    "No code issues discovered."

}

This works like a charm:

Static Analysis Output in PowerShell: 2 objects with 30 issues

Finally: Put it in a pipeline

Unsurprisingly, putting it in a pipeline was the easiest part. I took a pipeline I had that was already running a local Azure DevOps agent in my default pool, made sure SQL Code Analysis was present in the correct directory on that machine and voilà! The build fails if it finds any issues.

N.B. I just stuck the raw PowerShell in the pipeline, you would be better off passing connection and location variables to the PowerShell script using custom Azure DevOps environment (and secret) variables. Oh, and having a better install directory for Code Analysis than Downloads, my bad…

Example YAML containing the PowerShell step
Code Analysis finds issues, so the PowerShell exists with Code 1, causing the build to fail

Time to choose.

There are a couple of things I’ve assumed here – I’m running it locally on a server and running against a database, and that database could be one that I’ve just built during my CI pipeline, absolutely – but you could also run this against a scripts folder / set of scripts, so even if you don’t yet have a full build / deploy process, or you have a different process that works for you – you can still include SQL Code Analysis with fairly minimal overhead! Enjoy!

Author: PlantBasedSQL

A 20-something guy living in the UK. I work. I play. I like to bake. I like to explore. What would you like to do today?

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